December Blog Event!

special blog event coming, watch this space!

I have decided to run a special blog event starting this Thursday 1st December in the run up to Christmas. Not saying anything else just at present except that it’s going to be fun! Check back here on Wednesday when I will reveal all…

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HOW TO PUT YOUR ART ON CERAMICS

My trainticketart on ceramics – but first – New stickers for Autumn/Halloween!

I’ve just designed this set of bright but spooky watercolour Hallowe’en planner stickers. They are for sale over on Etsy.

Planner stickers for halloween

Lots of bats and black cats!

So far, I have only sold planner stickers in my Etsy shop but yesterday I grouped five of them (including the halloween ones) into one package and am selling it on Creative Market.

5 sets of planner stickers in contrasting colours

5 sets of planner stickers in contrasting colours

 

To reflect the trend for bigger, brighter photos in blogs, I have also rewritten my tutorial How To Make A Concertina Book and replaced the photos with better, larger and hopefully clearer ones.

And so to the ceramics…

If you’ve been following me on Facebook  or Instagram, you’ll know that I have some of my trainticketart in another Diverse Manners exhibition in the Riverfront Arts Centre in Newport for the next 3 weeks – but it is a bit different this time.  When we were in France (see previous post), we were staying near Limoges, a famous porcelain making area, so of course we had to visit one of the factory shops!

I bought ten white porcelain door plates which I thought would be great to put some of my train ticket art on to.  This was my process: 

  1. I scanned the artwork into my computer at a high resolution (1200dpi). I selected 10 of these, cropped to the correct size.  I then boosted the levels in Photoshop to enhance the colour saturation and placed them all together on one A3 sized document.  There was some space left so I added a tile sized piece and some strips to fill the sheet completely. You pay for a whole A3 sheet so you might as well get as many ceramics as possible!  
  2. I then uploaded it to Digital Ceramics in Stoke on Trent (my home town). They printed it on ceramic decals and sent it back to me within 3 days.  I was very impressed with their service!
  3. I took the sheet and the porcelain doorplates to my friend Fiona at Barefoot Ceramics. She is a fellow member of Diverse Manners.  She showed me how to float the decals off the backing paper and smooth them over the doorplates and tiles.  This done, she fired them for me.  They were a great success and I think look impressive as ceramics.
ceramic doorplates with images of beach huts, screwed to wooden batons

To exhibit them, I screwed them on to a wooden baton that I’ve painted to look like weather worn seaside fences.

Here are some photos of the results.  I used several train tickets which have a beach hut theme.  Screwing them to the batons was the hardest part!

chaotic table with a lot of mess

See the chaos on my work table? Screwing things isn’t my strong point! Blood, sweat and tears is more to the point.

The exhibition is on until 22 October.  We have an open afternoon this Saturday 8 October from 2pm to 4pm to meet the artists.  If you are in the area or fancy a trip to South Wales, do pop in and introduce yourself.  You can see some of the other artwork on the Diverse Manners Facebook page.

exhibition of trainticketart on door plates and tiles

Here they are hanging in the gallery in the Riverfront. To the left are the original train tickets (I had to rush home to get another to fill the gap!). To the right are the tiles in box frames.

Hope to see some of you there!

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SHIBORI IN FRANCE

My husband and I had a holiday in Haute Vienne in France in early June.  One of the places we visited was a papermill and paper museum called the Moulin du Got which had an exhibition that reminded me of shibori and manipulated fabric.  Here are some of the exhibits – looking at the website I think these are all by the artist Fritz Jacquet.

"Starry" by Fritz Jacquet 2016 in exhibition at papermaking museum

“Starry” by Fritz Jacquet 2016 in exhibition at papermaking museum

Another creation of paper manipulation

Another creation of paper manipulation

The papermill was in an area famous for its tapestry – Aubusson and Felletin – and I had a fascinating tour around a museum of tapestry cartoons (the paintings which provide the guide for the tapestry weaver).

paper sculpture

I love the way these paper sculptures have been lit!

Do you remember the shibori fabric in the last post and that I thought of making a bag with it? Well, I bought a pdf pattern of this bag – the Zip-To-It from Cloudsplitter Bags – and decided to make a practice version first. Here it is!  I really enjoyed making it and can thoroughly recommend the pattern: it comes with lots of photos to walk you through the (quite complicated) process.  This practice session was useful because I came to the conclusion that Spoonflower’s ecocanvas would probably be too thick to use for it (this one has several layers of quilting fabric plus interfacing and zip and my sewing machine was protesting at certain points!).  So I will use a simpler pattern, and maybe make a tote or a bag for planner supplies (or both!).  I love this bag though, and can see myself making a few more.

flowery Zip-To-It bag

I enjoyed picking out the different fabrics for it from my stash.

I took it to my son Barney’s graduation from Trinity College, Cambridge last month.

Cambridge graduation photo

Posing for the obligatory graduation photo!

I have just started a Facebook group for customers and fans of my digital downloads and scrapbooking papers.  It is called Plummer Printables and I’m hoping that we will be able to discuss what we can do with the digital papers and planner stickers/clipart and share links to tutorials and ideas.  If you are interested in joining, please click the link and ask to be added to the group.

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EXPERIMENTING WITH JAPANESE SHIBORI PATTERNS

I’ve been quiet on here for a while but have been busy adding digital scrapbook kits to my shops on Etsy and Creative Market.  One of the kits has indigo blue shibori patterns, developed from both tie dyed fabric and paper.

Indigo shibori Digital Paper Pack by Liz Plummer - printable for scrapbook paper, DIY wedding invitations, envelopes, etc

This photo shows some of the things you can do with the shibori paper

Shibori is a Japanese tie dyeing method of making patterns, usually in indigo.  In Japan, this traditional art has some amazingly complex stitching designs: the act of gathering the fabric acts as a resist so that the dye only reaches the parts that haven’t been gathered tightly.  Sometimes it is pleated and clamped.  When I did my City & Guilds in patchwork and quilting we wrapped it tightly round pieces of drainpipe and pushed it down really hard then poured the dye over it. This produced some really striking patterns.  Here is the account of how I dyed one of the patterns in the kit.

I have a book by Yoshika Wada called Shibori: the Inventive Art of Japanese Shaped Resist Dyeing.  The patterns shown there are varied and awesome.  My patterns, in comparison, are relatively simple.  I’ve mixed them with watercolour stripes and dashes.

I’ve got a Shibori board on Pinterest if you would like to see lots of examples.

Apparently the word ‘shibori’ comes from the verb shiboru which means to wring, squeeze or press, and denotes the process of manipulating fabric, treating it as a 3 dimensional form rather than a 2 dimensional surface.  Michelle Griffiths, a textile artist based not far from here in South Wales, makes amazing sculptural textile designs by leaving the cloth in this dimensional form.  I’ve pinned some photos of her work on the board on Pinterest.

The digital files in my kits can be used for scrapbooking, digital journaling, wedding invitations, to make envelopes and other stationery, or as blog backgrounds or for the new style Etsy cover photos.

I uploaded one of the patterns to Spoonflower and ordered a metre of it when they had a half price sale on their eco canvas. Here it is hanging on my design wall.  I think I’m going to make a bag out of some of it – I quite like this design.

a yard of Shibori pattern by Liz Plummer printed by Spoonflower on eco canvas

I like the faint, subtle markings where the dye just stained the paper a bit as well as the more vibrant parts.

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