Online Textile History websites

Online Textile History websites

 

In the course of compiling my Googlemaps Map of Textile Museums, I came across several websites with interesting websites but no actual museum site, so I thought I would list them here.

CottonTown
Cottontown tells the story of a manufacturing process that started in isolated cottages on the wind and rain swept West Pennines and ended with derelict weaving sheds and the demolition of tall, soot blackened mill chimneys. In between was the boom time, when Cotton was King and Blackburn was the weaving capital of the world, when millionaire magnates lived in country mansions and the workers made the best of it in overcrowded, uncomfortable, unsanitary conditions.

The Textile Society – UK based website

Textile Society of America

The Fabric Museum – an online Fabric Museum

Spinning The Web – an online history of the cotton industry around Manchester, UK

Ingenious – has links to lots of historical textile artifacts

Virtual Plastics Museum

Knitting Together – the history of knitting in the East Midlands

Witney Blanket Story

Cotton Threads

Museum of Ancient Inventions – this has lots of links to textile related artifacts

Virtual Sewing Machines Museum

Links relating to Welsh Woollen industry

Derwent Valley Mills

From Weaver to Web

Colour Experience – run by Society of Dyers and Colourists and gives information on dyeing and the textile industry.

Irish Historical Textiles

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8 Comments:

  1. Pingback: Dreaming Spirals » Blog Archive » Textile Museums Map - a start!

  2. Hello,

    A textile-related question here. About 25 years ago my husband picked up a little lavender sachet in a shop in York, near the Minster, made of cotton fabric with a silk-screened drawing of a boy chorister in robes on it – both front and back views. It seems to me that this type and style of print was available on a number of textile gift items in the 1970s, in England. Any idea what company produced these?

    Thank you.

  3. Hi there, this is a great list. Could I give a shout out to my own website? Thanks! ;)

  4. Yes, of course! I’ll add your blog to my links.

  5. great site, always on the hunt for historical work and good going..cannot seem to connect with email subscription?

  6. Hi Linda, thanks for letting me know about the email subscription, it seems to have worked now; I changed the form recently so I’ll check I have it installed right….

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