Hi!  I’m Liz, welcome!

Are you looking for colourful hand dyed printables?  For scrapbooking, stationery or your blog or online shop?   Have a look around…

Shop

The products below are all instant downloads available from my shop on Etsy.  To see more, click here.

This is what some of my customers say:

“Pretty design that was quick and easy to download and print. Very happy with my printable purchase from this shop.”

“I am in love with these digital papers. I created a kit using these and another fashion clipart set and I was in awe how beautiful it turned out. These are some of the most unique designs I’ve ever seen”

About

Liz Plummer pic

When I signed up for a City & Guilds course in patchwork and quilting in 2001 I didn’t know it would lead me to explorations in painting and dyeing…

I am a textile and mixed media artist and surface pattern designer living in South Wales, UK: the natural world and the effects of light and reflections inspire my work.


I love creating complex, layered patterns with lots of texture and colour and am inspired by the unpredictability of paint and dye on paper and fabric: the results of my experiments often creep into my designs.  I love printing: monoprinting, screenprinting and block printing; many of the images produced in this media inspire the motifs in my surface pattern designs and textures. Recently I’ve been making daily art on discarded train tickets as a way of encouraging my creative process to develop: I suppose they are a kind of tiny sketchbook.  I often post these on my Instagram.


I sell digital downloads (scrapbook kits, planner stickers etc) of a selection of my patterns and textures on Etsy and Creative Market, and printed on various products at Redbubble and Society 6.


I started blogging in 2005 and have had articles published in the Computer Textile Design Group magazine as well as in online in Fibre&Stitch and Workshop on the Web.  My train ticket art project was featured on the Pattern Observer blog in 2015.


Locally, Ishadow teazle am a member of the Diverse Manners arts group in Newport, South Wales, UK and have exhibited with them several times.


I studied history at St Andrews University so my researches into family history and social history often creep into the blog and sometimes inform my designs.

Shibori Bag

  I finally used this piece of my shibori fabric! You might remember I had a yard of this design printed on Spoonflower Eco Canvas fabric about a year ago.  Since then, I’ve been looking at it and wondering what would be best to make with it.   If you’ve been following me on social media, …

How to Make a Concertina Book

concertinabook-pin
**New updated 7/9/16 with new photos**

 

I made a new book using my printable shibori patterns kit as the photos on the old article were looking a bit small and dark (I must have learnt more about taking and editing photos since then!).

This is going to have a lot of photos. You have been warned!

Scissors, Pritt stick, knife and shibori papers all ready for action
Some of my equipment all ready for use

You need:

  • Two pieces of mountboard. Mine were 8 cm square.  I used the cardboard back page from an old sketchpad.
  • Two pieces of painted papers, fabric, handmade paper or similar, slightly larger than the mountboard, to cover it.
  • Six pieces of painted papers (or however many you want). Mine were 14 cm square. I printed out the papers on A4 paper double sided though actually they would be okay single sided as half the paper gets glued to the next page so you could glue the white sides to each other.    The kit is 12″ square but printing on A4 or letter size will just crop it automatically.
  • Gluestick.
  • Scissors
  • Old magazine or similar to do the glueing on.
concertina book spread out
This is what it looks like inside

This shows how a concertina book is constructed. It has a cover at either end and six folded pieces of paper in between. I used my printable shibori papers, both to cover the mountboard for the covers and for the folded paper.

card covered covers of concertina book using printable indigo watercolour paper - brushstrokes and dashes
The covers of the book

I cut a square of mountboard (thick card) about 3 inches square – see below – and covered it with paper.

card and paper all ready to glue to make the covers of the concertina book
Here is the mountboard and the paper cut to size for the covers – you can see that I’ve cut the corners off the one on the right to make it neater when it is glued down

I cut a piece of paper slightly larger than the card and cut across the corners, glueing the paper to the card and over the edges. The paper needs to completely cover the inside edges but it is not necessary to cover the very middle because the folded papers will be glued on here.

cover of concertina book with ruler to show size
The back of the cover all glued down with a ruler to show the size.

As you can see, this is just over 3 inches square, but the exact size doesn’t matter. You can make them bigger or smaller as you wish. The inside folded papers, when folded into four, should be just a little bit smaller than the covers – mine are about 0.25 inches smaller all round. So my covers are 3 and one eighth inches square (8 cm) and the folded paper when laid flat is just under 5 and a half inches square (14 cm)(this will be folded into four). (I obviously used the metric side of my ruler when I made these!)

watercolour paper folded ready for making the pages
Paper folded lengthwise and diagonally

Take a square of painted paper. This shows the folds.

watercolour paper folded
Paper folded in half lengthwise

Fold this paper in half lengthwise, open it out, turn it 90 degrees and fold it lengthwise again. Then turn it over.

paper folded diagonally
Paper turned over and folded diagonally

Fold the paper diagonally, press the edge well and open out. Just do this on one diagonal, not both.

inside page folded ready to glue
Paper folded correctly

Turn the paper over again and push the corners with the diagonal folds towards each other so it looks like this (above). If you have done origami, this will be easy. When folded flat it will be a square that is a quarter the area of the whole piece. Repeat with all six pieces of paper.

6 blue papers folded ready to glue
6 pages folded correctly and lined up ready to be glued together

Put the papers in the order you want to glue them together.

tie dye paper being glued
Glueing the paper

Put glue all over one square side of the paper. Try not to get any glue along the edges or it may make them stick together. Wipe any excess off.

Pressing blue shibori tie dye paper down to stick to cover of handmade book
Paper being pressed down on to cover

Place the glued side on to the wrong side of the cover centrally and press it down.  Press down hard so that it sticks! If you use a gluestick it should stay in place fairly quickly.

another page is added to the book
Add another page to the book

Put glue on to the second piece of folded paper and position it on top of the first the same way round (ie. so that the corner with the ‘flaps’ is towards you). Turn the whole thing round 180 degrees so that the folded corner without the flaps is towards you and the corner with the flaps is away from you.

putting glue on the next page
more glue

Put glue on the next piece of paper and position it on top of the rest with the corner with the flaps towards you (ie. the opposite way round from the rest of the pages). Do the same with the next piece of paper and then turn it 180 degrees again and put the last two pieces of paper on top so that they are facing the same way as the first two you did. (If you don’t put them the right way round, don’t worry – it will just stand up differently to mine but still look fine – in fact, I did a couple where I did the first three pieces of paper one way round then I put the next three the other way, rather than two:two:two as I am showing you here). As you glue each page on, press it down well so that it sticks and doesn’t move around too much when you put the next one on.

concertina book with three shibori pages glued together in correct orientation
Three pages glued together and opened up

Here is the book with three folded pages glued together, one the opposite way round to the other two.

shibori concertina book with cover about to be attached
Book with cover waiting to be glued on

Here it is with all the pages glued on, ready for the cover to be added.

Put glue on the top page, line up the cover level with the bottom cover and stick it on, wrong side on to the paper.

Pressing the cover of the concertina book down
Pressing the whole thing down well

Now press the whole thing down well to stick it together nicely.

concertina book with pages opened
Checking pages are not stuck together where they shouldn’t be

Then open it up carefully and check none of the pages are stuck where they shouldn’t be. If they are, prize them apart. This should be fairly easy if you haven’t been too wild with the glue. It is important to do this now, before the glue has dried hard. If there are any gobs of glue on any of the edges, wipe them off carefully with your fingers.

concertina book opened out
Concertina book all opened out

Hey Presto! A concertina book!

concertina book all finished with inspirational quote
All finished!

I decided to use my hexagon die cutter to cut out a quote from my Inspirational Words printable to decorate the front cover.

A pile of little handmade concertina books that I've made
A pile of little handmade concertina books that I’ve made

Here are several books which I have made in this way. I hope you have enjoyed this tutorial. Happy glueing! If there are any points you are confused about, let me know and I’ll try and elucidate.