Discharging fabric

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Last week I spent several hours discharging some of the fabric that I printed in the autumn as well as some ugly fabric which was languishing on my shelves from previous screenprinting attempts.  I also discharged some black fabric.  I used formosol with print paste.   The smell is still hanging around my studio, even though I did the actual discharging outside wearing a respirator.

Here are a couple of them, showing the progression of colour on and off them.  (I just spent a good while searching for photos of the original fabric on Picasa too – at least this blog can now serve as documentation of their development!).

This  fabric started off as an unprepossessing dyed/printed piece from 2006. This was part of it originally:

 ugly fabric

It sat on my shelves because I didn’t know what on earth to do with it.  So I painted it red this autumn.

ugly red fabric

I wasn’t sure I liked it any more like this.  So I screened it with discharge paste and a thermofax screen I made from a home made rubber stamp design and now I like it a lot better!

red fabric discharged

You can see a little peek of the second fabric on that photo above, which has also been overprinted with the same screen.

Here is how it started:

ugly screenprinted fabric 

This fabric was made from a breakdown printing screen and was one of the pieces made when the screen was breaking down quite a lot and much of the original detail had been lost.  This page shows the original screenprinting session results.

DSCN1896

I wanted to unify it all and didn’t particularly like the original fabric so I overprinted it with the ‘squares’ screen in black.  Here it is on my table just after being printed.

printed and discharged fabric

As well as printing with black, I decided to give it some depth by discharging areas using the same screen.  So here it is now – I think it looks much better.  Not sure where both of these pieces are going next but I hope it doesn’t take another 5 years to decide!!

Painting with ochres and soy milk

A few months ago I bought some natural ochres from Clearwell Caves, some old coppermines in the Forest of Dean.  I also had some natural dye extracts, so I decided to do some painting with them, using soy milk as a binder.   I had fun and just played without thinking too much.  And here are the results.

ochre painted fabric in studio

Here they are drying in my workroom.  That old clothes horse I found while tidying the boxroom came in useful!  (So obviously tidying does have its benefits…

ochre painted fabric

This is the first I did.  It’s roughly based on one of my doodles.

tree ochre painted

Here’s a sort of stylized tree.

ochre painted rusted fabric 

I painted this to enhance some rust dyed fabric.

ochre painted fabric

A lot of what I was painted was for textures, to print on or to cut up and use for journals.   I thought of printing one of my Gocco house screens on top of this.

ochre painted fabric

This is a sort of brick texture.  I printed it using the tip of a sponge brush.

overpainted blue fabric with ochres

This was overpainted on to some blue fabric.

ochre painted textural fabric

And this was another ‘texture’ painting.  The fabric is quite shiny and it looks quite effective.

Now I have to leave them for a few months to batch, so the colours don’t just wash out.  So no guilt about not using them! 

Fabric postcards

I’m taking part in a fabric postcard swap at the moment (see
art2mail: mailable fabric postcards for more details).

This is one of them I made – I painted calico with acrylic paints, layered it with voile and then sewed house shapes on with more calico. I thought the voile on top of the painted fabric made it look like pavements in the rain, reflecting and distorting the colours.

I learnt the technique of layering voile at an embroidery course with Virginia Hole at our local quilt shop, Busy Bees.